Fight Fatigue with These Four Tips

At one point in our lives, we’ve all woken up and thought: Wow, I feel well-rested. Sure, it might have happened on vacation in the Bahamas, and you woke up well past noon—but ever since then, you’ve been chasing that euphoria.  

Now you’re snoozing through class or have reached for your third…fourth…fifth…twelfth cup of coffee after another early morning commute (even if it’s still just from your bedroom to your desk in the living room).

Well, to help you on your journey toward reinvigoration and revitalization, here are four tips for fighting fatigue:

1. Prioritize your workload.

Stress will wipe you out. Work, school, kids, partners, bills, and life, in general, will have you riding the never-ending fatigue Ferris wheel. 

To alleviate this, write out a to-do list and prioritize your tasks. Try to delegate some of your workload or reschedule less important list items for when you have more time.  

And don’t forget to make your well-being priority number one. 

2. Exercise.

Won’t working out make me more tired? Didn’t you just say to take things off my to-do list?

Slow down, my sleepy friend. 

Exercise provides your cells with more energy to burn and produces crazy nice chemicals in your brain that will elevate your mood. Plus, it’s proven to enhance the quality of your nighttime slumber. 

If you listen to your body and don’t overwork it—exercise can be the key to beating your fatigue. Check out this article for workout ideas when you’re just not in the mood to workout. 

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3. Use supplements to your advantage.

Deciding which supplements to take should be based on both your body’s natural makeup and your diet. 

For instance, those with a Vitamin D deficiency can take D3 supplements or those on a low-carb keto diet can replenish their energy via MCT oil or ketone BHB mineral salts (P.S. you can bundle those here). 

If you’re a caffeine-lover, but energy drinks overwhelm you with jitters—try this L-Theanine & Caffeine 2-in-1 formula. It’s designed to support energy levels and cognitive performance without the jitters or crashes. 

4. Consult your doctor.

This may be frustrating advice. I get it—you looked to the internet for answers to avoid a physician’s visit. 

However, if you’ve tried resolving the issue on your own and are coming up short, a doctor can test your blood for things like thyroid dysfunction or anemia which can cause chronic fatigue. From there, you can work with your doctor on a health plan suited to your body’s needs.

All in all, this is a reminder to reduce your stress, move a little, take your vitamins, and schedule your annual physical exam. Also—drink water, limit alcohol, and don’t smoke. Most of all, I hope you all get a good night’s rest so you can wake up tomorrow feeling refreshed and ready to tackle the day. 

 

This article was written by Melissa Pelowski. Interested in writing for us too? Email your pitch to submissions@sportsresearch.com for consideration.